Blandy & Blandy LLP Solicitors

Insights // 06 January 2020

Entering a New Decade: Looking to the Future of MEES

Associate solicitor Gemma Smith, in our Commercial Property team, looks at the future of the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES).

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) as set out in the Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property) (England and Wales) Regulations 2015 came into force on 1 April 2018.  The introduction and regular review is part of the UK’s commitment to bring all greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

The requirements under the regulations are that, subject to certain exemptions:

  • As of 1 April 2018 commercial landlords have not been able to lawfully grant a tenancy (even a renewal to an existing tenant) if the property has an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of F or G.
  • From 1 April 2020 residential landlords will not be permitted to continue accepting rent from a tenant of a property which is already let if the property has an EPC rating of F or G.
  • From 1 April 2023 commercial landlords will not be permitted to continue accepting rent from a tenant of a property which is already let if the property has an EPC rating of F or G.

There is now a suggestion that the minimum EPC rating for letting will be raised again in 2030 to either a B or C, quite an increase from the currently required E.  It is not clear at this point whether there will be a single implementation date in 2030 to the B or C level or if there will be incremental increases through this decade.

Incremental implementation is likely to be preferable in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and it is likely to be easier for landlords to keep up; though some may well prefer to carry out all of the works in one go – in which case, the answer is to do them earlier than required as they are likely to result in energy savings.

Whatever is decided in terms of implementation, it is clear that the intention is to significantly increase the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards for rented buildings, so landlords, be prepared!

If you need advice on the impact of MEES on a letting or sale, please contact a member of our commercial property team.

For further information or legal advice, please contact law@blandy.co.uk or call 0118 951 6800. 

This article is intended for the use of clients and other interested parties. The information contained in it is believed to be correct at the date of publication, but it is necessarily of a brief and general nature and should not be relied upon as a substitute for specific professional advice.

Gemma Smith

Gemma Smith

Associate Solicitor, Commercial Property Law

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