Blandy & Blandy LLP Solicitors

Insights // 14 May 2019

Family Law - Financial Dispute Resolution (FDR) Hearings Explained

Solicitor Rebecca Ledgerwood, in our leading Family law team, explains Financial Dispute Resolution (FDR) Hearings.

If one spouse issues an application for a Financial Remedy Order then the parties embark on a three hearing process for the Court. The Financial Dispute Resolution (FDR) hearing is the second hearing; it comes after the First Appointment and before the Final Hearing.

By the time the FDR hearing comes around both parties should have complied with their obligations to complete full and frank disclosure enabling all assets/liabilities to have been identified and a value attributed.

The FDR hearing is not a conventional hearing. The hearing is aimed at assisting the parties reach an agreed settlement. FDRs are “without prejudice” to either parties’ positions at a Final Hearing. This means that if one spouse puts forward an offer for settlement but it is not accepted by the other side, it cannot be referred to at the Final Hearing. The judge who hears the FDR can no longer be involved in the case. They will not be the judge at any future hearings.

It is not unusual for much of the day to be spent in a conference room or waiting area of the court building engaging in negotiations. All parties will go before the judge to receive a judicial indication. The judge will hear short submissions from both parties/ their legal representatives setting out their proposal for settlement. The judge will then provide their judicial indication as to what they consider the Court would most likely order at a Final Hearing.

It is important to understand that the judge will not be hearing any evidence from either party, only submissions, and will therefore not make any findings either for or against a party. Indications are usually broad brush in their approach and provide the parties with a “range” for settlement. They can also offer assistance in explaining the structure of any settlement offer.

Once the judicial indication has been received, the parties and their legal advisors will have time to reflect on the same and, if appropriate, continue negotiations to see if settlement can be reached. Settlement will only be reached if both parties agree. If the parties cannot reach an agreed settlement the matter will be set down for a Final Hearing.

In our experience, it is not unusual for cases to settle on the day of or shortly after the FDR hearing so it can often be a useful stage in the Court process.

If you require any further information about this or any other aspect of the Court process, our Family law team can help.

For further information or legal advice, please contact law@blandy.co.uk or call 0118 951 6800. 

This article is intended for the use of clients and other interested parties. The information contained in it is believed to be correct at the date of publication, but it is necessarily of a brief and general nature and should not be relied upon as a substitute for specific professional advice.

Rebecca Ledgerwood

Rebecca Ledgerwood

Solicitor, Family Law

Read Bio

News & Insights

Firm's Probate, Tax & Trusts Team Continues to Grow
David Lamont

David Lamont

Marketing Manager

Blandy & Blandy LLP Named as Top Ranked Firm
David Lamont

David Lamont

Marketing Manager

Employee With Short Service Awarded Nearly £30,000 in Race Discrimination Claim
Laura Binnie

Laura Binnie

Associate Solicitor, Employment Law

The Importance of Obtaining a Financial Order on Divorce
Catherine Currie

Catherine Currie

Solicitor, Family Law

Disability Discrimination: When Do Employers Need to be Aware of Disability?
Laura Binnie

Laura Binnie

Associate Solicitor, Employment Law

End of Life Planning: Detailing Funeral Wishes in Your Will
Patrick Brennan

Patrick Brennan

Associate Solicitor, Wills, Probate, Tax & Trusts

Defamation in the Social Media Age
Eleanor Waters

Eleanor Waters

Solicitor, Dispute Resolution

Blandy & Blandy LLP Recognised for Conveyancing Expertise
David Lamont

David Lamont

Marketing Manager

Registering Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) Deposits – a Reminder to Landlords
Jessica Irwin

Jessica Irwin

Senior Associate Solicitor, Dispute Resolution

View More